ACT members will appear at CRTC hearings on October 23, 2018

Kim Sawchuk, Anne Caines, and Kendra Besanger will travel to Gatineau, QC to participate in the CRTC’s public hearing on Canadian telecommunication companies’ aggressive and misleading sales tactics.

ACT will present findings from their recent report, Experiences of Older Adults with Abusive Sales Practices of Canadian Telecommunication Providers.

Read more about the full intervention here.

ACT network members’ recent publications

We are happy to share a list of ACT network members’ publications that have been released within the past few months.

May Chazan, Melissa Baldwin, and Patricia Evans (2018) – Unsettling Activisms: Critical Interventions on Aging, Gender, and Social Change. Women’s Press/ Canadian Scholars’ Press. The book launch will take place on October 27 in Peterborough, ON.

Stephen Katz (2018)- “The Greatest Band that Never Was: Music, Memory and Boomer Biography” in Popular Music and Society. 

Jane Traies (2018) – Now You See Me. Tollington Press

Lisa Carver (2018) – “Why life insurance companies want your Fitbit data” in the Conversation Canada.

Loredana Ivan, Ioana Schiau and Corina Buzoianu (2018) – “The Use of a Drawing Tool to Assess the Implicit Ageism of Students” in Slovensky Narodopis

Oded Zafrani and Galit Nimrod (2018) – “Towards a Holistic Approach to Studying Human-Robot Interaction in Later Life” in The Gerontologist.

 

Expanding our understanding of activism(s) by sharing stories of older activists

In their recently released book, Unsettling Activisms: Critical Interventions on Aging, Gender, and Social Change (Women’s Press, 2018), editors May Chazan, Melissa Baldwin, and Patricia Evans present compelling reasons why our common perceptions of activisms and activists need to be expanded; specifically, expanded to include the work of older women activists.

Creating spaces for dialogue and critical exploration at GUSEGG: a Conversation with Dr. Kim Sawchuk on the 2018 ageing, communication, and technologies module.

Each year in July, GUSEGG provides a unique opportunity for professors and students from around the world to explore new ideas and dive into challenging topics. It is intensive, personal, intimate, and distinct from a typical university setting. Students and professors learn together from early morning until late evening in a setting where critical thought and challenging conversations extend beyond the walls of the classroom.

Martine Lagacé named to the National Seniors Council

ACT co-applicant Martine Lagacé, a professor at the University of Ottawa was recently named to the National Seniors Council (NSC). The NSC’s mission is to consult with Canadian seniors, experts and other stakeholders so as to advise the federal government and inform public policy on matters related to the health and well-being of older adults. Lagacé brings to the NSC a wealth of expertise in the area of ageism and age-based discrimination. She will serve as part of the Council until June 2020.

 

CRTC opens inquiry into misleading or aggressive practices of telecommunication services providers

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission has recently opened an official inquiry into the “use of misleading or aggressive telecommunications services providers.” And, as of August 2018, we are actively encouraging Canadians – especially older adults – to participate in this important consultation process.

Coding old age in social imaginaries

This month’s In Focus article comes to us from Dr. Sakari Taipale at the University of Jyväskylä in Finland. Taipale is a research group leader for the Centre of Excellence in Research on Ageing and Care (CoEAgeCare), which studies the transformations in ageing in a digital age through analyses of everyday life and societal and policy change. In his paper, Taipale considers the ways in which digitalization of everyday life has shifted the ways we think about age and ageing.

ACT releases the report on the first wave of its cross-country longitudinal study

ACT is pleased to announce the release of the report of the first wave of its cross-country longitudinal study. The report, which is titled Older audiences in the digital media environment: A cross-national longitudinal study, provides an overview of some key findings about seniors’ uses of media from a 2016 wave of quantitative data collection, undertaken in seven countries.

The project involves teams from multiple partnered universities in Austria, Canada, Israel, the Netherlands, Romania, and Spain. It offers a unique opportunity to explore possible processes of displacement of traditional dominant media by innovative communication practices within the older audience of new media. Replicating Nimrod’s (2017) study of older audiences, data is being collected on a biannual basis over a five-year period, for a total of three waves. This first report outlines some of the results from the first wave of the study, which is based on surveys from Internet users aged 60 and up, to whom we will return in the following waves.

Older audiences in the digital media environment: A cross-national longitudinal study (PDF, 1.4MB)

RECAA’s activism and World Elder Abuse Awareness Day

une 15 is World Elder Abuse Awareness Day (WEAAD). It was initiated by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations in 2006, and serves as a day for the world to voice its opposition to the mistreatment of seniors. In Montreal, ACT’s community partner Respecting Elders: Communities Against Abuse (RECAA) uses the day to inclusively raise awareness of elder mistreatment and elder abuse, by way of theatre practices, creative interventions and hand-to-hand leafleting in the streets.