Entries by Constance Lafontaine

Postdoctoral Fellowship in Ageing, Communication and Technologies

About the research The research project “Ageing, communication, technologies: experiencing a digital world in later life” (ACT) is seeking applications for a postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Communication Studies at Concordia University, under the supervision of ACT Director Dr. Kim Sawchuk. ACT is offering a postdoctoral fellowship in the area of “Ageing and big […]

ACT submits CRTC intervention on the need to include older adults in establishing broadcasting policy

In October 2017, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) issued a “Call for comments on the Governor in Council’s request for a report on future programming distribution models” (CRTC-2017-359) and invited the general public, industry stakeholders and interveners from other sectors to provide input on the future of media distribution models in Canada. With […]

New ACT Bursaries for Graduate Students

The ACT Student Bursaries are awarded to students enrolled in master’s or doctoral programs in ACT partner universities, and who are conducting research on the intersections of ageing, communication and technologies as part of their thesis project. ACT will award up to four competitive bursaries per year; two for doctoral students ($2,000 CAD each) and […]

Shannon Hebblethwaite and Concordia research on aging featured in the Montreal Gazette

ACT researcher Shannon Hebblethwaite was recently featured in a piece in the Montreal Gazette titled “New research from Concordia examines how we can age well while living healthier, longer“. Hebbelthwaite, who is a professor of applied human sciences at Concordia University and the director of the recently-formed engAGE centre for research on aging, discusses her […]

ACT PhD and MA scholarship opportunities at Concordia University

About the research Kim Sawchuk, Professor in Communication Studies and Director of ACT, is offering scholarship opportunities to students applying for Concordia University’s MA in Media Studies or PhD in Communication Studies at Concordia University. The student will join an exciting department, a dynamic group of researchers and community partners as part of the ACT […]

Our Fitbits, our (aging)selves? Digital self-tracking and embodied aging

At the 2017 Consumer Electronics Show, Samsung surprised business-watchers with a shift in market development plans. Expected to focus on robots, they instead announced a focus on wearable health devices, such as fitness trackers, believing that (according to their CEO) “an aging society will help this market segment grow more quickly”. This article explores the different ways that self-tracking technologies depending on age. For older adults, conversations ten toward mitigating risks, and identifying onsets of, age-related decline.